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Things to Do in Yorkshire - page 2

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North Yorkshire Moors Railway
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Welcome aboard the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, a historic rail line in North England. When it first opened in 1835 trains were originally horse drawn, except at a steep incline where they were hauled by rope. It wasn’t until 1845 that steam engines came into the picture.

When first created it served as a trade link, today it’s Britain’s most popular heritage steam railway carrying more than 300-thousand annual visitors along 18 miles of railway. In addition to rolling through impressive scenery in the heart of the North York Moors National Park, each station along the line takes passengers on a trip back in time depicting a year from 1912 to 1952. But the “celebrity station’ is Goathland, maybe better known as Hogsmeade. The station was transformed into Hogsmeade station for the first Harry Potter film.

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Whitby
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Captain Cook Memorial Museum
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Chronicling the life and times of the iconic explorer, the Captain Cook Memorial Museum offers fascinating insight into Whitby's most famous former resident. Housed in the 17th-century home where a young James Cook took on his apprenticeship as a seaman, the museum’s star attraction is Cook’s attic room, decked out in period furnishings. At the museum, visitors can learn about Cook's now-legendary voyages through a fascinating collection of artifacts, letters, ship models and maps. Pore over original letters written by Cook and his crew; follow his travels through maps and charts; see items brought back from Cook's long journeys to New Zealand and the Pacific Islands; and admire paintings of the voyages by Parkinson, Hodges and Webber.

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More Things to Do in Yorkshire

Beningbrough Hall

Beningbrough Hall

Built in 1716 on the Yorkshire meadows, Beningbrough Hall served as a family home, inherited and passed down and around over many generations during the 1700 and 1800s. During the Second World War Beningbrough was called into service and used to house airmen from bomber squadrons. It wasn’t until the late 1970s when The National Trust began restoring its Baroque interiors that it became popular with visitors.

Art lovers especially will enjoy spending time inside Beningbrough Hall. Thanks to a unique partnership with the National Portrait Gallery, nearly 130 portraits are on exhibit. The walled gardens contain flowers and vegetables, and staff gardeners have been known to offer growing tips to interested visitors. Families are also welcome at Beningbrough Hall. There’s a wilderness play area and assorted activities like art workshops designed to entertain.

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