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Things to Do in Tulum

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Casa Cenote
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19 Tours and Activities

Beautiful, underwater sinkholes flooded with light, the cenotes of Riviera Maya, Mexico are a natural wonder and a sight to behold. Though there are many throughout the region, Casa Cenote is uniquely located in a mangrove forest close to the sea. It can be thought of as almost an underwater jungle with its algae-covered mangrove forest and soft sands.

As it is mostly open to the sky, it is less enclosed than neighboring cenotes and often has more aquatic life to see. The cenote connects one of the world’s largest underwater river systems to the ocean. Because of this, it is possible to see both fresh and saltwater fish. The unique combination of clear freshwater conditions and underwater caverns and formations make this an interesting spot for scuba divers and snorkelers. Streams of light penetrating the water from the surface add to the beauty and intrigue visible from both above and below.

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Cenote Dos Ojos
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The Mayans called this breathtaking underwater destination a sacred well. Today, travelers call it a once-in-a-lifetime SCUBA diving experience. That’s because open water certified divers can explore the incredible caves and underground rivers that have been around for nearly 7,000 years. Some 300 miles of connected underwater passageways create what can only be described as a truly natural wonder. Visitors can get an up close look at the remarkable ecosystems that exist only here and float through clear blue waters in a landscape filled with rocky stalactites and stalagmites.

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Mayan Ruins of Coba (Zona Arqueológica de Cobá)
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473 Tours and Activities

The Coba Ruins, built long ago—sometime between the years 500 and 900—lie deep in the heart of the Yucatan jungle. Visitors can rent bikes or hire rickshaws to travel among the knobby paths and thick forest that link the groupings of ancient pyramids and historic sites to one another.

A climb to the top of the Nohuch Mul pyramid, the tallest in the Yucatan, affords visitors a spectacular (if nerve-wracking) view of the jungle, as well as the astronomical observatory and game courts that surround it. From this vantage point, travelers can also check out the Mayan’s version of an interstate highway: elevated roads called sacbeob, that lead from the ruins to other Mayan cities.

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