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Paseo de Montejo
Paseo de Montejo

Paseo de Montejo

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22 Reviews
Free admission

The Basics

Named for the founder of the city of Mérida—Francisco de Montejo y León—the Paseo de Montejo is home to highlights such as the architecturally eclectic Cantón Palace, since converted into Mérida’s Museum of Anthropology and History, the Quinta Montes Molina mansion, and the Monumento a la Patria (Monument to the Fatherland). As one of Mérida’s principal thoroughfares, the Paseo de Montejo features in most city walking tours. Multi-day excursions to Mérida, Uxmal, and Chichén Itzá also typically include a visit the Paseo de Montejo. Alternatively, stroll the length of this notable thoroughfare independently or hitch a ride in a horse and carriage.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Paseo de Montejo is a must-visit for fans of history and architecture.
  • There are plenty of restaurants and cafes along the Paseo de Montejo.
  • Wear comfortable shoes if you plan to walk the full length of the boulevard.
  • Paseo de Montejo has wide, paved sidewalks and is fully wheelchair and stroller accessible.
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How to Get There

The Paseo de Montejo stretches from the Montejo Monument in the south to the Monument to the Fatherland in the north, before eventually turning into a highway. From Merida’s Plaza Grande, it’s a 15-minute walk north and most travelers find it easiest to arrive on foot. Once there, walking the length of the boulevard takes about 30 minutes.

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When to Get There

The Paseo de Montejo is a public thoroughfare that’s accessible year-round, although it’s best to visit in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the worst of the day’s heat. Most of the Paseo de Montejo’s attractions open between 8am and 5pm, while bars and restaurants tend to stay open later. Visit on a Sunday when street food vendors and artists sell their wares along the Paseo de Montejo.

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Wildcard

The Paseo de Montejo is populated with notable buildings and monuments, but there’s much more to Mérida than this French-style boulevard. Architecture fans should do a lap of the Plaza Grande, home to the San Ildefonso Cathedral, Casa de Montejo, and City Hall. Meanwhile, history buffs may prefer to visit one of the many historic haciendas which surround Mérida.

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