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Things to Do in Central Mexico

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Teotihuacan
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Known as the City of the Gods, Teotihuacán was the metropolis of a mysterious Mesoamerican civilization that reached its zenith around AD 100. Once the largest city in the region but abandoned centuries before the arrival of the Aztecs, Teotihuacán boasts towering pyramids and stone temples with detailed statues and intricate murals.

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Xochimilco
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With its brightly paintedtrajineras (flat-bottomed boats), traditionalchinampas (floating gardens), and network of flower-perfumed canals, Xochimilco—the “Flower Garden”—is the kind of place that will have you reaching for your camera at every turn.

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Catemaco Lake (Laguna Catemaco)
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Catemaco Lake, or Laguna Catemaco, is a natural wonderland for travelers who love the outdoors. Whether it’s joining one of the thousands of fishermen casting lines into the 22-meter-deep waters, or hiring a boat to explore the surrounding sites, Catemaco is a still undeveloped Mecca perfect for spending a sunny afternoon.

This rustic freshwater lake in south central Veracruz was formed by a natural lava flow from the nearby San Marin Tuxtla volcano. Its chilly waters and the fertile foothills that surround it offer plenty of options for outdoor exploring. Travelers can hire a local boat and paddle into the depths of the lake before washing ashore Monkey Island, where playful primates swing freely between towering emerald green trees. Or they can head to nearby Nanciyaga Ecological Reserve for a refreshing swim in the peaceful lagoon, followed by relaxing mud massages and a dip in the hot springs.

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Frida Kahlo Museum (Museo Frida Kahlo)
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Known as the Blue House (La Casa Azul) for its bold blue façade, the Frida Kahlo Museum (Museo Frida Kahlo) was the birthplace and childhood home of the well-known Mexican artist. Inside, the fascinating collection of personal items, furnishings, sketches, and paintings offer insight into both the life and art of Frida Kahlo.

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Coyoacán
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Coyoacán, one of Mexico City’s oldest districts, is alive with color and culture. Centered around twin plazas perfect for people watching—Plaza Hidalgo and Jardín Centenario—Coyoacán is characterized by museums, quaint cobblestone streets, and roadside churro vendors.

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Coatepec
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Coatepec, also known as the serpent mountain, is one of the most sacred places in Aztec mythology. It’s believed that the iconic Mexican tribe came upon this mystical town on their way to Central Mexico, and made it their home for more than 30 years.

The Aztecs built an impressive temple on a hilltop here to pay homage to the god Huitzilopochtli. The structure was so loved that when the tribe finally completed their journey to Tenochtitlan, they built a replica of the Coatepec temple at the new site.

In addition to its prominent place is Aztec history, Coatepec has a major role in contemporary culture, too. The town is referred to by some as Mexico’s capital of coffee, because the nation’s most popular brews: Bola de Oro and Le Vereda, come from this municipality.

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Xalapa
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It’s easy to see why Xalapa, the capital city of the state of Veracruz, is fondly referred to as the San Francisco of Mexico. This colorful urban center has the same laid back charm and electric night life, with an equally youthful vibe. College students buzz through Xalapa’s hilly city streets aboard quick moving scooters, while well-heeled business men and women make their way to work through the bustling business district.

Dozens of popular cafes that line the streets of Xalapa, where, students, travelers and the city’s cultural elite brush elbows over steaming cups of strong brew. The country’s second-largest archaeological collection is housed in the city’s Museo de Antropologia and travelers say the grounds of this unique landmark are worth a visit. The collection of exhibits, which outlines the traditions and artwork of the Totonac and Huastec people, provide a comprehensive history for first-time visitors. Nearby Parque Ecologico Macuiltepetl, a tranquil 40-hectare park, is home to plenty of running trials and offers impressive views of the Xalapa skyline from atop an extinct volcano.

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El Tajin
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Perhaps the most well-preserved pre-Hispanic ruins in the state of Veracruz, El Tajin is rich with Mexican history and mythology from the infamous Totonac people.

Archeologists believe this once thriving town was occupied as early as the year 800. Its fertile grounds are divided into three distinct areas that include open plazas, natural greenery and iconic pyramids, including the famous Pyramid of the Niches. This popular landmark was built at approximately the same time as the well-known Chichen Itza in the Mayan Region. Its rocky steps lead to a peak that’s home to incredible views and a holy temple where Totonacs once worshiped.

El Tajin Ruins are numerous, and while the World Heritage Site is interesting to wander alone, expert guides are available for travelers looking to learn even more about the history, culture and traditions of the Totonac from a resident expert.

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Piedra Herrada (Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary)
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Each autumn as many as a billion monarch butterflies from across the United States and Canada migrate south to the forests of central Mexico in one of the planet’s most spectacular animal migrations. Piedra Herrada Sanctuary is one of a few areas of the UNESCO-listed Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve open to the public.

Visitors trek into the forest on horseback before continuing on foot to a remote roost where monarchs are known to congregate. During butterfly season, the area’s fir trees are coated in an undulating blanket of orange and black wings, with occasional pockets of butterflies bursting into flight and filling the sky. As one of the biosphere reserve’s newer areas, Piedra Herrada Sanctuary sees fewer visitors, lending the experience a more isolated feel.

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Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe (Basilica de Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe)
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Among the most visited Catholic pilgrimage sites in the world, the Shrine of Guadalupe atop Tepeyac Hill in Mexico City honors the legendary 16th-century appearance of the Virgin Mary to Juan Diego, a local peasant. The shrine, also known as the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe (Basilica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe), is devoted to the patron saint of Mexico.

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More Things to Do in Central Mexico

Plaza de la Constitución (Zocalo)

Plaza de la Constitución (Zocalo)

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Mexico City’s Plaza de la Constitución, better known as the Zocalo, is the cultural and historic heart of the city. This large open-air square in the Centro Historico is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and home to the city's top attractions, including Metropolitan Cathedral, National Palace, and Great Temple archaeological site and museum.

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National Museum of Anthropology (Museo Nacional de Antropologia)

National Museum of Anthropology (Museo Nacional de Antropologia)

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Considered one of the world’s most comprehensive natural history museums, the National Museum of Anthropology (Museo Nacional de Antropología) is Mexico City’s most visited museum. Its collection includes notable historical items such as the Aztec Stone of the Sun, the giant carved heads of the Olmec people, and the Aztec Xochipilli statue.

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Centro Historico

Centro Historico

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Built on the site of the ancient Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán, the Centro Histórico is both the historical heart and the modern epicenter of Mexico City. Centered on the grand Zócalo—Plaza de la Constitución—the sprawling district is preserved as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is full of historic monuments, museums, parks, and hotels.

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Papantla

Papantla

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The town of Papantla is located deep in the heart of the Totonacapan region about three hours north of Veracruz City. This quiet haven is famous for its impressive views of the majestic Sierra Papanteca range, sweet indigenous vanilla, Totonac people and the popular El Tajin ruins.

Enjoy breakfast at one of the local cafes before taking to the streets in search of the eleven murals painted by Mexican masters like Teodoro Cano Garcia—a student of Diego Rivera. One of the most famous of these is located in the Church of Nuestra Senora de la Asuncion. The city is also known for its numerous museums, but travelers agree the unique Museo de las Mascaras, which contains more than 300 masks from around the country, is definitely worth a visit.

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National Palace (Palacio Nacional)

National Palace (Palacio Nacional)

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The National Palace (Palacio Nacional) has served as the seat of the Mexican federal government since the age of the Aztecs. Although it’s a working building with many offices that are off limits to visitors, there’s still plenty to explore and admire, including Diego Rivera’s famous panoramic mural, The History of Mexico.

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Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes)

Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes)

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As Mexico City’s major cultural center, the Palace of Fine Arts hosts art exhibitions and a range of live events, including music, dance, theater, and opera. The building is a mix of art nouveau, art deco, and baroque architectural styles referred to as Porfiriano, after Mexican President Porfirio Diaz who commissioned the project.

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Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec)

Chapultepec Castle (Castillo de Chapultepec)

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The only palace on the continent, Chapultepec Castle sits more than 7,000 feet (2,133 meters) above sea level in Mexico City’s Chapultepec Park. It has housed royalty, served as a military academy, and was even an observatory. In 1996, the castle was transformed into Capulet Mansion for the movieWilliam Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

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Veracruz Pier (Malecon)

Veracruz Pier (Malecon)

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During early morning hours the Malecon stretching between Veracruz and Boca del Rio fills with local runners jogging along the scenic path that wraps around the ocean’s edge. But by mid-afternoon, it’s travelers that flood the area known for its pre-colonial architecture and fine views of imposing naval ships. Stalls selling handmade crafts and traditional food line the area, and happy couples stroll the promenade eating ice cream cones on hot summer days while listening to musicians perform mariachi music in the streets.

The Malecon’s relaxing daytime vibe comes alive at night, when cool breezes bring locals back outdoors to enjoy refreshing drinks at the crowded tables of nearby cafes as traditional folk dancers and live musicians stage acts in the open air.

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Azteca Stadium (Estadio Azteca)

Azteca Stadium (Estadio Azteca)

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Soccer—orfútbol as it’s called in Spanish—is an integral part of Mexican culture. For the country’s people, Azteca Stadium (Estadio Azteca), which is the largest stadium in Mexico, is the heart of the sport. Home to the professional soccer team Club América and the Mexican national team, the 84,000-seat stadium is the first venue to host two FIFA World Cup finals, and it will welcome a third in 2026.

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San Juan de Ulúa Fortress

San Juan de Ulúa Fortress

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San Juan de Ulua is a maze of historic fortresses and prison cells on a shadowy island overlooking the once-busy port of Veracruz. Constructed in 1956, the fort is home to a dark history that includes captured naval fleets, African slave trade and international treasure.

During the nineteenth century the imposing stone walls and deep dungeons of San Juan de Ulua served as a prison for Mexican political activists. The views from the old lookout tower make it a popular attraction, but a hidden chapel on the southwest side of the structure, massive treasure storage rooms and the dungeon of San Juan de Ulua, which housed the legendary bandit Chucho el Roto, are also worth a look.

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Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral (Catedral Metropolitana)

Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral (Catedral Metropolitana)

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Built on Aztec temple ruins, no building better exemplifies the history of Mexico City than the Metropolitan Cathedral (Catedral Metropolitana). The vast stone edifice blends architectural styles and building innovations across four centuries. Highlights include the gilded Altar of Forgiveness and the painted canvases lining the sacristy.

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Museo del Templo Mayor (Templo Mayor Museum)

Museo del Templo Mayor (Templo Mayor Museum)

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What remains of the Aztecs’ Great Temple (Templo Mayor) sits right in the middle of Mexico City, but many tourists miss it. In 1978, a massive, 8-ton (7,000-kilogram) stone depicting Coyolxauhqui (the Aztec goddess of the moon) was unearthed, marking the location of the temple, a gathering place sacred for the Aztecs during the 1300s and 1400s.

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Chapultepec Park (Bosque de Chapultepec)

Chapultepec Park (Bosque de Chapultepec)

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Chapultepec Park, named for the Aztec word chapoltepec (at the grasshopper’s hill), is one of the world's largest city parks. The green space spans 1,695 acres (686 hectares) and is dissected by walking paths connecting quiet ponds, monumental buildings, and museums, including the Museum of Anthropology and the Rufino Tamayo Museum.

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Paseo de la Reforma

Paseo de la Reforma

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France has the Champs-Élysées, New Orleans has St. Charles Street, and Mexico City has the Paseo de la Reforma. More than just a major thoroughfare that spans the length of the city, the street is a historical touchstone to remind all who pass through of the robust history of Mexico City.

Once commissioned by then-newly crowned emperor Maximilian, the Paseo de la Reforma was built to connect the center of the city with his imperial residence, Chapultepec Castle in Chapultepec Park. Originally named after his beloved, the promenade was named Paseo de la Emparitz. After Maximilian’s execution and the liberation of the Mexican people, the street was renamed the Paseo de la Reforma and has since stood as a testament to the resiliency of the Mexican people.

Today, the most prominent buildings in Mexico City reside along the avenue. For a time during President Diego’s regime, the paseo became popular with the Mexican elite, and some European styled houses developed. Also along the paseo are many historic monuments, including ones to Cuauhtémoc, Simón Bolívar, José de San Martín and Christopher Columbus.

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