Recent Searches
Clear
Villa Crespo
Villa Crespo

Villa Crespo

Villa Crespo, Buenos Aires

The Basics

The variety of cuisine on offer is one of Villa Crespo’s biggest draws—you’ll find everything from Middle Eastern, Jewish, African, and Chinese food to one of the city’s oldest and best-known vegetarian restaurants. Photography tours of the Argentine capital also typically pass through the neighborhood for a chance to capture its colorful streets.

Meanwhile, night owls can hit the dance floor at some of the city’s most exclusive nightclubs, while art lovers can see street murals by Argentina’s top artists on a guided graffiti tour of the city, with visits to the neighborhoods of Colegiales, Chacarita, and Palermo often included.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Villa Crespo is a must-visit for foodies, night owls, and shopping enthusiasts.

  • Wear sturdy shoes suitable for walking over uneven surfaces; some of the streets here are cobbled.

  • Bring US dollars, especially if you plan to shop in Villa Crespo; you can often get discounts for paying in cash.

Show all

How to Get There

To get to the neighborhood on public transportation, take the subway line B to Estación Villa Crespo. If you’re taking a cab, ask your hotel or a restaurant to call one for you and direct them to Villa Crespo. Some tours to and of the neighborhood also include round-trip transportation.

Show all

Trip ideas

Wine Tasting in Buenos Aires

Wine Tasting in Buenos Aires

How to Spend 2 Days in Buenos Aires

How to Spend 2 Days in Buenos Aires


When to Get There

The best time to visit Villa Crespo depends on the experience you’re hoping to have. By day, it’s a shopping hub selling a combination of brand names and leather goods. After dark, it’s one of the city’s hottest dining and drinking destinations. If you plan to eat, remember that the typical mealtime in Argentina can be as late as 10pm.

Show all

History of Villa Crespo

Villa Crespo got its start in the closing years of the 19th century as a residential neighborhood for workers at the National Shoe Factory, which opened in the area in 1888. It gets its name from former Buenos Aires mayor Antonio Crespo.

Show all